Work and Organizational Psychology Expert Panel

Among our experts are researchers who specialize in work and organizational psychology as well as human resources (HR) management. Work addiction is as much a clinical problem as it is an organizational behavior and an issue that is deeply embedded in work psychology and management practices. Organizational climate and culture are among the most important factors affecting workaholic behaviors. To understand them and to develop effective organizational solutions we need integrations and close collaboration between clinical and work psychology researchers. The members of our team of collaborators represent countries from all over the world.

The list is arranged alphabetically.

Jim Arrowsmith, Ph.D.

School of Management

 Massey Business School Massey University Auckland

 New Zealand

 
Jim has  PhD in Management and works at Massey Business School in New Zealand. His research interests are in human resource management and employment relations, specifically concerning working time, employee engagement and pay.  

The publications in work and stress psychology include:

Arrowsmith, J. 2013. ‘Working Time in Europe’, in  Arrowsmith, J. and Pulignano, V. (eds.).  The Transformation of Employment Relations in Europe. New York/ London: Routledge.111-132
Arrowsmith, J. 2002. ‘The struggle over working time in nineteenth and twentieth century Britain’, Historical Studies in Industrial Relations 13. 83-117

Shahnaz Aziz, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology
East Carolina University
USA
 
Professor of Psychology and Director of Industrial/Organizational Psychology at East Carolina University (ECU); served as Associate Chair of ECU’s Department of Psychology. Research interests and expertise include: employee health and well-being, workaholism, work-life balance, work stress, and occupational health. Applied experience in training needs assessment, survey development, focus groups, and job analysis. Recipient of the UNC Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching Award. Recipient of an NIH Grant focused on workaholism and metabolic outcomes. Recipient of ECU’s Harriot College of Arts & Sciences Grant-Seeking Reassignment Award. Recipient of ECU’s Harriot College of Arts & Sciences Summer Research Award. Recipient of ECU’s Psychology Department Hendrix Award for Faculty Excellence (for highest level of excellence in scholarly achievements, excellence in teaching and mentoring activity, and service to the department, university, and profession). Recipient of ECU’s Psychology Department Faculty Appreciation for Graduate Student Mentoring Award. Finalist for ECU’s Distinguished Graduate Mentoring Award.

Cristian Balducci, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
University of Bologna

Italy
 
Associate professor of work and organizational psychology at the University of Bologna, Italy.
The author of numerous papers on work addiction. The most recent publications in this area include:
 
Balducci, C., Menghini, L., Conway, P. M., Burr, H., Zaniboni, S. (2022). Workaholism and the enactment of bullying behavior at work: A Prospective Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19, 2399.
Balducci, C., Alessandri, G., Zaniboni, S., Avanzi, L., Borgogni, L., & Fraccaroli, F. (2021). The impact of workaholism on day-level workload and emotional exhaustion, and on longer-term job performance. Work & Stress, 35(1), 6-26.
Balducci, C., Spagnoli, P., Toderi, S., & Clark, M. (2021). A within-individual investigation on the relationship between day level workaholism and systolic blood pressure. Work & Stress. https://doi.org/10.1080/02678373.2021.1976883

Nicolas Gillet, Ph.D.

QualiPsy EE 1901, Université de Tours, Tours, France 
 Institut Universitaire de France (IUF), Paris, France
 
France

My research activities focus on motivational processes (e.g., motivation, workaholism, engagement) in the work context as well as on their determinants (e.g., leadership, job design) and consequences (e.g., performance, well-being).

The author of numerous papers on work addiction. The most recent publications in this area include:
 
Gillet, N., Morin, A. J., Sandrin, E., & Houle, S. A. (2018). Investigating the combined effects of workaholism and work engagement: A substantive-methodological synergy of variable-centered and person-centered methodologies. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 109, 54-77.
Gillet, N., Morin, A. J., Ndiaye, A., Colombat, P., Sandrin, E., & Fouquereau, E. (2022). Complementary variable‐and person‐centred approaches to the dimensionality of workaholism. Applied Psychology, 71(1), 312-355.

Jane Parker, Ph.D.

School of Management

Massey Business School Massey University Auckland 

New Zealand

 
Jane has a PhD in Industrial Relations and works in the School of Management at Massey Business School in New Zealand. Her research interests include comparative employment relations, strategic HRM, and workplace democracy and inclusion.

The publications in work and stress psychology include:

Parker, J., (lead ed.), Baird, M., Donnelly, N. and Cooper, R. (2022). Women and work in Asia and the Pacific: Experiences, challenges and ways forward. Auckland: Massey University press. 

Parker, J., Arrowsmith, J., Young-Hauser, A., Hodgetts, D., Carr, S., Haar, J. and Alefaio-Tugia, S. (2022). Perceptions of living wage impacts in Aotearoa New Zealand: towards a multi-level contextualised conceptualisation. Personnel Review, Vol. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/PR-01-2021-0037

Paola Spagnoli, Ph.D.

Associate Professor in Work and Organizational Psychology

Department of Psychology

 University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli

Italy

The author of numerous papers on work addiction. The most recent publications in this area include:
 
Molino, M., Kovalchuk, L. S., Ghislieri, C., & Spagnoli, P. (2022). Work Addiction Among Employees and Self-Employed Workers: An Investigation Based on the Italian Version of the Bergen Work Addiction Scale. Europe’s Journal of Psychology, 18(3), 279–292. doi.org/10.5964/ejop.2607
Balducci, C., Spagnoli, P., Toderi, S., & Clark, M. A. (2021). A within-individual investigation on the relationship between day level workaholism and systolic blood pressure. Work and Stress, doi:10.1080/02678373.2021.1976883
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